Author Topic: franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience  (Read 510 times)

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Offline franksolich

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franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience
« on: January 10, 2017, 04:09:07 PM »
With all the bitching the primitives are doing about the incoming Great and Glorious Leader, and threatening to boycott people and businesses that have any connections with him, I had a moral crisis of Great Proportions last night.  In fact, it kept me awake nearly all night.

Because I’d spent far less money during all of 2016 than I’d anticipated, I ended up with a nice surplus with which to be wildly extravagant.  But should I spend it at a business that has a primitive on its payroll?

I collect coins, mostly pre-1967 but even more so pre-1861 English coins, and while one can still find some things reasonably priced, over the years their “values” have slipped upwards, getting out of my reach, or nearly so.

I’ve never in my life collected coins—or anything else—with their “increase in value over some period of time” in mind.  It’s a casual, leisurely hobby, not a retirement plan.  I’ve always collected coins—and everything else—simply because I was attracted by the aesthetics and qualities of one thing or the other.

And “price” has never been a consideration; if I like something well enough, whatever the price is, is okay with me.  I’m not a shopper-around-for-bargains; I’m simply a buyer-of-that-which-appeals.

Where others think I’m an idiot is that I won’t buy any coins in pristine or uncirculated condition; while I wish to have attractive coins, I want coins that have actually been used as money.  I don’t bother with considerably worn-down coins, though; just those graded as “fine,” “very fine,” or “extremely fine,” showing at least enough wear-and-tear to prove they were once actually used as money.

Because of my somewhat-vast treasury accumulated through living the non-decadent, spartan, ascetic life, I decided this time around I could afford a few things more expensive than what I’ve usually gotten.  Not a lot, but at least a few, in this case certain coins in the $100-$600 price range.

I also decided I should like to start collecting British coins of Queen Anne (r. 1702-1714), of which there appears to be many in my “new” temporary price-range.  For no reason other than I think they’re very aesthetic coins, very tasteful and of understated sublime beauty.




Three times in the past—although not recently, the most-recent being maybe six years ago—I’ve purchased select coins from the firm in Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas, that has Attila Marc the Hun, the DFW primitive, on its payroll. 

It’s kind of the Nieman-Marcus of the numismatic world, high-end merchandise and pretty ritzy, but at the same time it practices excellent customer service, and makes even the “little” or occasional customer feel as if he’s important to them.  They’re not only professionals there; they’re nice guys too.

I’ve dealt with them via telephone before, inquiries about this thing or another thing (and ended up buying, or trying to buy, what I’d inquired about); I’m sure it ruffled them, trying to communicate with a deaf person, but they remained naturally courteous and unflappable nonetheless.

I never dealt with Attila Marc the Hun, who’s a third of the way around the globe; these were people in the office down in Texas.

However, because I have no patience with all this auction nonsense, those three preceding times I had someone else doing the auction part for me.  Personally, I prefer that sellers simply stick price-tags on things, the buyer deciding whether or not something’s worth that price.  I just don’t have the time or the patience to play auction games.

I’m not sure yet if I’m going to do that again, or try the auction game myself, but unlike the sore-loser primitives, I don’t hold a businessman’s politics against him.  It’s his products and services I’m interested in buying, not his politics anyway.

Offline Carl

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Re: franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2017, 06:37:37 PM »
I doubt his company has any real idea what a pompous gasbag and profound idiot Marc truly is but no matter,life is meant to be spent trying to do as good as one can for themselves so if that is the best avenue then continue traveling it.

Offline FunkyZero

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Re: franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2017, 07:07:14 PM »
I've always had an interest in coins, but I'm too stupid to collect them.
It's like navigating the arctic without a map. There's so many gotchas...
I do have a bunch of old real silver dollars from the 1800's. I think there are 40 or 50 of them in that box.
Grandpa gave them to me many years ago

Offline franksolich

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Re: franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2017, 07:20:24 PM »
I've always had an interest in coins, but I'm too stupid to collect them.
It's like navigating the arctic without a map. There's so many gotchas...
I do have a bunch of old real silver dollars from the 1800's. I think there are 40 or 50 of them in that box.
Grandpa gave them to me many years ago

You're right about the "gotchas;" that's why one should look into other things as investments, not coins.

Me, I just look at them as my owning small works of pleasing art.

Your silver dollars are most likely common dates--they usually are--but at the same time, they're not chopped liver either.  Don't lose them or give them away.

Offline FunkyZero

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Re: franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2017, 07:30:24 PM »
You're right about the "gotchas;" that's why one should look into other things as investments, not coins.

Me, I just look at them as my owning small works of pleasing art.

Your silver dollars are most likely common dates--they usually are--but at the same time, they're not chopped liver either.  Don't lose them or give them away.

Ive got them in a safe deposit box.
That box has about 163 pounds of pure silver in it total.. all 1oz bullion junk except for those coins
The bank guys got really nasty with me the last couple times because it took 2 of them to get it down and the near busted their balls doing it. They keep telling me i have to split it up but no way...

Offline freedumb2003b

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Re: franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2017, 07:47:18 PM »
I don't think you should let an employee's politics as ANY establishment interfere with your doing business there.

If there was a special burger spot in town that you LOVED (think In-N-Out) and Doug Bulna worked there, would you forgo your favorite burger (double-double)?

By allowing them to control your actions in ANY WAY gives them power well beyond what they actually have.

Enjoy your hobby with a joyful and lifted heart.  That is the best "revenge" you can have, since you know that all DUmmies have dark hearts where no joy can enter.
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Offline BattleHymn

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Re: franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2017, 08:10:07 PM »
I've got a soft spot for Morgans, Peace Dollars and 1oz silver bullion, in that order.  I especially seek out toned silver coins.  I also have some fractional currency and collect obsolete bank notes.  FZ, I'd be glad to help those guys at your bank ease their burden.  :-) 

Most of my Morgan collection was passed down to me from someone who had access to mint bagged coins that were distributed to banks 60 years ago, but I still seek them out on my own. 

I wouldn't hesitate to buy something if the cost were fair from anyone.  To not do so strictly on politics is stupid business.  I'm sure Marc would agree, as it's obvious Frank is a good customer.

Offline franksolich

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Re: franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2017, 08:24:21 PM »
Most of my Morgan collection was passed down to me from someone who had access to mint bagged coins that were distributed to banks 60 years ago, but I still seek them out on my own.

That was about the time--actually more like 50, not 60, years ago--that the U.S. Treasury started phasing out redeeming silver certificates (the bills with blue, rather than green, seals) with silver dollars.

It's the main reason bright uncirculated silver dollars are so common even these days; they were minted to satisfy Democrat lawmakers from silver-producing states during the 1880s, 1890s, and 1900s, but there being no demand for them, they just sat around in bags, untouched.

The government during the mid-1960s got rid of most of them by simply asking people to turn in their paper silver certificates for them.

Offline BattleHymn

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Re: franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2017, 08:43:38 PM »
That was about the time--actually more like 50, not 60, years ago--that the U.S. Treasury started phasing out redeeming silver certificates (the bills with blue, rather than green, seals) with silver dollars.

It's the main reason bright uncirculated silver dollars are so common even these days; they were minted to satisfy Democrat lawmakers from silver-producing states during the 1880s, 1890s, and 1900s, but there being no demand for them, they just sat around in bags, untouched.

The government during the mid-1960s got rid of most of them by simply asking people to turn in their paper silver certificates for them.

These were a little different than the releases in the 60s, though.  I can pinpoint them from about 1955-1959 as to when they were collected.  I'm not entirely sure if I can attribute them to some earlier release from the Treasury, or the vast amount of sealed mint bags that the person had access to at the time.  What I am certain of is that it was definitely before 1960. 

Maybe Marc knows, and he'll chime in. 

Offline franksolich

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Re: franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2017, 08:55:00 PM »
These were a little different than the releases in the 60s, though.  I can pinpoint them from about 1955-1959 as to when they were collected.  I'm not entirely sure if I can attribute them to some earlier release from the Treasury, or the vast amount of sealed mint bags that the person had access to at the time.  What I am certain of is that it was definitely before 1960. 

Maybe Marc knows, and he'll chime in.

As incredible as it might seem these days, there was nothing special about silver dollars during this time.  They weren't used a whole lot, but they were around, and could be gotten easily, usually by turning in silver certificates, which the government was trying to replace with the green-sealed Federal Reserve Notes.

My parents observed their 25th--silver--wedding anniversary about this same time (the mid-1960s; I was a late but not the last child) and one of the gifts was an apple pie that held twenty-five silver dollars from the 1880s, 1890s, and 1900s, all of them gotten at the local bank.

Silver dollars have always been a problem for the Treasury, both the real ones (90% silver) and the fake ones made since 1980 or whenever it was the "gold" ones came out.  Silver silver dollars were substantially overproduced so as to please Democrat politicians from the silver-producing states--as long as the government bought silver, the miners had work--and these current "gold" silver dollars were originally produced to please the women's-libbers.

The mints made tons of them, but nobody wanted them.

Offline BattleHymn

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Re: franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2017, 09:01:55 PM »
The mints made tons of them, but nobody wanted them.

I'd imagine carrying around a few in your pocket all day might have had something to do with it. The suckers are heavy. 

What is your take on the U.S. Trade Dollar? 

Offline franksolich

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Re: franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2017, 09:05:33 PM »
I'd imagine carrying around a few in your pocket all day might have had something to do with it. The suckers are heavy. 

What is your take on the U.S. Trade Dollar?

They're okay as a curiosity; I was never into them.

Although just as good as the British trade dollar and the Austrian thaler--same weight, same silver content--they never caught on as these two others did, having been around a lot longer, and hence more trusted.  One has to remember that trade dollars were used mostly by the illiterate and the unschooled, and so they had to be good, which they were.

Offline FunkyZero

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Re: franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience
« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2017, 09:35:48 PM »
As incredible as it might seem these days, there was nothing special about silver dollars during this time.  They weren't used a whole lot, but they were around, and could be gotten easily, usually by turning in silver certificates, which the government was trying to replace with the green-sealed Federal Reserve Notes.



That appeared to be the case with the folks I know.
All through the depression and beyond, the grandparents and older folks all stashed them for savings. They were easy enough to hide and didn't hurt them to get wet.
When grandpa gave his away back in the 80s, he split them between all us grand kids equally. I think there were 18 of us at we each got like 50 of them (I can't remember the count exactly).  A lot of them are in good shape, but I do have some that are worn pretty badly. As I recall, some of them you couldn't even make out the date on them very well. I do know they were all minted in the 1800's, but I can't remember the years. Probably none of them are worth more than spot, but it came from grandpas stash so I've no interest in ever selling them anyway

Offline BlueStateSaint

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Re: franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience
« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2017, 07:41:06 AM »
I've got a soft spot for Morgans, Peace Dollars and 1oz silver bullion, in that order.  I especially seek out toned silver coins.  I also have some fractional currency and collect obsolete bank notes.  FZ, I'd be glad to help those guys at your bank ease their burden.  :-) 

Most of my Morgan collection was passed down to me from someone who had access to mint bagged coins that were distributed to banks 60 years ago, but I still seek them out on my own.

I wouldn't hesitate to buy something if the cost were fair from anyone.  To not do so strictly on politics is stupid business.  I'm sure Marc would agree, as it's obvious Frank is a good customer.

I'm insanely jealous of this.  Oh well!  I'll live.  I've thought about getting some (more) silver coins.  Also these:

https://www.moneymetals.com/silver-bullet-1-troy-oz-999-fine-silver/223?utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=bingads&utm_campaign=PLAs

A couple of Glock mags' full. :whistling:
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Offline BattleHymn

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Re: franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience
« Reply #14 on: January 11, 2017, 11:29:13 AM »
I'm insanely jealous of this.  Oh well!  I'll live.  I've thought about getting some (more) silver coins.  Also these:

https://www.moneymetals.com/silver-bullet-1-troy-oz-999-fine-silver/223?utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=bingads&utm_campaign=PLAs

A couple of Glock mags' full. :whistling:

Those are great.  :-)

I should add that the person who had access to the Morgans worked for a bank.  I chatted with them earlier, and they said some had been distributed later, but that the location he worked at had a lot of them stored in their vault basement and needed the space.  He said most were still sealed from the Mint on them before he tore into them. 

Times were different then.  I have a small collection of things like Flying Eagle cents that were harvested from change at the bank, too.

Offline freedumb2003b

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Re: franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience
« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2017, 11:42:02 AM »
Remember this from when SNL was funny?


The South African ******and.  The gift that keeps grinning.
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Offline franksolich

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Re: franksolich deals with a primitive crisis of conscience
« Reply #16 on: January 11, 2017, 08:49:46 PM »
I got nowhere else to put this, and didn't want to start a new thread.

I just got done watching one of the greatest moves, ever, in the history of cinema, Julius Caesar from 2002.  Jeremy Sisto was awesome, but so was everybody else.  It was spellbinding, particularly when Caesar was attempting to bring illumination to the dark, superstitious French.

Just as the Duke of Wellington was compelled to do about 1900 years later.

It reminded one very much of Donald Trump trying to enlighten the dark, superstitious, reactionay, backwards Democrats, liberals, and primitives.

Awesome movie, Julius Caesar.  I'm gonna order a DVD of it, so I can watch it when the internet (and hence youtube) is down because of bad weather.