Author Topic: Geneaology - Anybody into it?  (Read 10991 times)

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Offline DixieBelle

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #25 on: August 10, 2011, 08:22:31 PM »
By far my favorite hobby to date!!! I am OBSESSED and have been since I was a little girl because my paternal grandfather was really into it and showed me family records that he had gathered for his research. I spent quite a bit of time last year buidling my tree on Ancestry.com and got sidetracked with real life.

I do agree in that it is time consuming and tedious but so worth it. ALWAYS double check sources though.

Have you tried here for the Civil War service? http://www.civilwar.nps.gov/cwss/soldiers.cfm This site appears to be temporarily down but I found a few of my family members and confirmed the service records others claimed.

Also for DAR, you can contact them and I recommend going to their website to poke around. My aunt started the process and I am picking up where she left off because we have more than one ancestor we can trace back to. They told us to stick with the easiest one first and then go back later to confirm the others.

Also, I haven't contacted these people yet but had the site saved in the files - http://www.apgen.org/index.html
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Offline whiffleball

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #26 on: August 11, 2011, 07:05:25 AM »
DB,

Thanks for the links.  Looks like the Civil War site is back up.

The National Archives site, but a bit user unfriendly (for me).

I went to the DAR site and found that someone had started the application process with one ancestor on my maternal side.  There's a ton of information there.

Freeborn,

That last post was riveting!  Enlisting at 48, and as a Private, is incomprehensible to me.  See, that's the type of information and stories I want to dig out for as many ancestors as possible.  I know that may bean impossible task.  So far I haven't found any non English speaking lines, but if I do I'll be grateful for the free translation programs online.

Offline vesta111

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #27 on: August 11, 2011, 09:46:33 AM »
One has to also remember that knighthoods when given to a family, the name changed.

Found this when looking for family that had come here in the 1600, and followed a link that brought me to the Lindsey family in England.

I was curious as to why my family crest looked like an out house with 3 half moons on it.    As the name was different from the Lindsey's I found that each half moon denoted a Knight and 3 brothers had been knighted , all 3 three came to America, one was lost , went south, never to be seen again and the other 2 came to this area and settled down on different sides of the river.  Came rise to to the pig thief's and river rats on my side and the farmers, good folk, on the other.

When tracking back ancestors the family name may have been given at at a time of Knighthood or to used to disguise their allegiance to England.   Never realised until I and family went searching that we were from the Lindsey family,   now we have to research them and how 3 brothers were knighted, darn they must have been interesting brothers.

Much fun, what is in our DNA, why are all members so different in one family ????

Check out old time census records, land grants and the earliest news papers in your area.  A good bet is the Civil war records on the woman that received Government pentions for dead husbands or son in the war.


Offline CG6468

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #28 on: August 27, 2011, 03:10:40 PM »
We received my FIL's military file today. Very interesting, but no description of the 100% USCG manned Navy ships that transported the SEABEEs to and from the South Pacific. He was on such vessels, both going to and coming from Tinian Island., from which the airfield he helped build was used by the ENOLA GAY when it took off to drop the A-bomb in Japan. I found that out from a different source, though.

I've found very little history - almost none - about the 13th Naval Construction Battalion, particularly in WWII. They did receive a unit commendation.
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Offline JGHB

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #29 on: September 11, 2011, 09:48:17 AM »
Thanks much Boudicca!  You're so right about the bad info; I'm finding far too much conflicting stuff that I know can't be right.

I want to do the DAR thing for my daughter and granddaughter.  Hopefully, it may help with a scholarship for the little one some day.

We found out after the fact that our daughter would have been eligible for a DAR scholarship.  It certainly would have helped with her tuition.
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Offline delilahmused

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #30 on: September 11, 2011, 05:28:32 PM »
We found out after the fact that our daughter would have been eligible for a DAR scholarship.  It certainly would have helped with her tuition.

My grandmother was a DAR member too so most of the genealogy has been done for me on my maternal grandparent's side. I need to start on my paternal grandmother's side before she's gone. She remembers her grandparents.

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Offline ollie

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Very in to it now..........
« Reply #31 on: December 20, 2011, 12:10:04 PM »
It all started about 15 years ago when as a lark, I researched the unidentified writer of a civil war diary. Long story short I  became entranced by his entries, the guy could really turn a phrase. I discovered his identity and got so interested I decided to research his entire life. I received his service record and pension record from the national archives and traveled all over Pennsylvania and lower New York state looking for hints on this guy. Well I did it, I covered his whole life from 1834 to 1922. In the end I discovered he was buried in an unmarked grave adjacent to his wife who had predeceased him. I applied to the VA and got him a head stone. I just had to pay the cemetery to plant it. Fitting end to a great project.

When I started, I had a fair to middling idea of what to do, though I had never done geneological research before. At any rate the bug bit me and I decided to do my own family. Problem was I ran into road blocks immediately. I asked my father questions about our Irish roots and was rebuffed with "Why, for all you know, our ancestors may be nothing but bog runners and horse thieves.." I told him I didn't care, that I thought we should do it anyway. So I joined ancestry.com and began to discover a bit of my family past.

It has proved to be very interesting. Especially because along the way, I discovered live German cousins in Europe (Mother's side) and Irish cousins here in the states from my great grandmother's sister's side. I've met the German cousins (my mother's father's sister's branch) and just last week was contacted by my Irish Grandmother's side. She found me by checking out my tree on Ancestry.com looking for common ancestors. We are making arrangements to meet in the spring. My sister and I are looking forward to it.

In the meantime, I'm still searching. I discovered one thing that threw me off, now life should be easier. My Irish grandfather had changed the spelling of his last name. Using the older spelling, I see that there are a lot more records out there, of which I was previously unaware. I feel like a detective solving a mystery.

Offline CG6468

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #32 on: December 20, 2011, 02:37:04 PM »
I found different spellings of the names of my mom's family, my dad's mother, my wife's father's and mother's names, etc. It can be a real headache, particularly when a roadblock is encountered - like someone who will not supply any info under any circumstances.

My uncle - my dad's brother - died in 2006, and no one even told me. I found out about it on the Social Security Death Index, with some further info from the company he and my dad worked for.

There is no communication from my aunt's family (my dad's sister) either, and I keep checking the SSDI for her name.

My wife's family is another very reluctant source of info.

When I think back to when my grandmothers were alive, they would have been thrilled to share their histories with me. Now, even all those old family Bibles are missing.

Through my digging, however, I now have over 7400 people listed in my family tree, all the way back to ~1580.
Illinois, south of the gun controllers in Chi town

Offline whiffleball

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #33 on: December 23, 2011, 05:31:30 AM »
The name changes have made things difficult for me.  One side dropped the 'e', the other exchange a middle 't' for 'd'.

I've also run into a marriage that records only 'Indian woman' as the wife.

This research has made me very sorry that I didn't sit down with my late uncle and talk with him about his Death March experience.  Right after my father died my uncle suddenly and unexpedtedly began to speak of it.  I was too wound up in my grief to do much beyond being struck that I'd never heard the story.  Hopefully, one of my cousins were there for him to listen if and when he wanted to talk again.

edited for horrible spelling


Offline JohnnyReb

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #34 on: December 23, 2011, 08:05:21 AM »
15 years ago, a distant relative I never knew about called and asked about my new born son, he was doing a family tree book. My son was the last entry in that book and the fellow even sent him a silver baby spoon with his name on it. Well, we all around here bought a copy of a very thick book he had made. We had a big family get together with everyone in this area with our last name. The fellow came and pointed out some...uh...rather interesting family ancestors.

He had traced our family tree back to 2 brothers that had come to this area with The Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. They returned with their families(1788 I think it was) at the end of the war and now over 5,000 people scattered all over the U.S. can trace their ancestry back to them. I did a little research on why here and learned some things I never knew. While Andrew Jackson is mentioned in the book, he was not blood kin and this area had a large Mennonite community that had sided with the king. The Mennonites were forced to leave after the revolution thus opening up a lot of land around here. The Mennonites moved to Nova Scotia.

Another cousin of mine got interested and traced the family tree on back to the first one to come over in 1635....and he was married to a XXXXXXXX which must have been a pretty good family because my grandmother and two more great grandmother whatevers were from that family tree.

My family tree has quite a few dead limbs in it caused by wars ranging from before The Revolutionary War until Viet Nam but none since then. The military service records read like a U.S, history book, French and Indian Wars, Revolutionary War (can't nail it down but one may have been one of the first MARINES. He is listed as serving on a ship under Capt. XXXXXX  a year after their formation), War of 1812, Mexican/American War (my Grandmothers family tree has a relative that died at the Alamo), Civil War but some would say they were on the wrong side(couple of graves in the church cemetery with CSA markers on them...and Sherman burned the local courthouse with all their enlistment/military records), Spanish American War, WW1, China, WW2, Korean War, Viet Nam, Granada, Iraq. ....and they fought and died in some of the most important battles we have ever fought.

I knew very little of my mothers family tree but a few years ago someone did it and it pretty much reads the same way. Enough so that I want to use DUmmies as sandbags in the next great war.

...and just to be honest. There are a few spotted clans of us scattered around that were started by rogues, scoundrels and down right crooks/criminals that moved away to avoid the long arm of the law.

An older fellow told me this 50+ years ago, "Best you don't shake your family tree to hard. There's no telling what might fall out of it." :-)

 
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Offline CG6468

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #35 on: December 23, 2011, 09:56:10 AM »
An older fellow told me this 50+ years ago, "Best you don't shake your family tree to hard. There's no telling what might fall out of it." :-)

For sure. I found relatives on both sides for my wife and me who died in insane asylums, alms houses (poor houses), bar fights - we're an interesting bunch!  :-)
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Offline Jasonw560

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #36 on: December 10, 2012, 01:07:42 PM »
I started last month. Since I am adopted, I am researching 3 different trees. My adopted mom, my biological grandmother and grandfather on my BMom's side.

I don't know how the SAR thing works, but I could apply.
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Offline BigTex

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #37 on: December 10, 2012, 01:30:58 PM »
My stepmom does genealogy, shes actually related to my mom way back on the family tree. My mom's side of the family came to America in 1618 on the pilgrim ship Neptune and settled in Texas just before the Texas Revolution some of which fought and died in it specifically in the back bean incident. My Dad's side of the family came to Texas just after the Texas revolution and more after the civil war. One of note is Dr. Colley for which the north Texas city of Colleyville is named. Thats about all I know of my family. Ill probably do some more research when I have more time on my hands.
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Offline CG6468

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #38 on: December 11, 2012, 11:47:58 AM »
My family came from Sweden (paternal) and Germany (maternal.) My wife's came from Germany and Ireland.
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Offline Dori

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #39 on: December 11, 2012, 12:09:48 PM »
I love working on geneaology.  It's like finding treasure when you find a familly connection.   :-)

So far, all mine have come from Europe, although there is family legends that I have American Indian, on both sides ?????
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Offline CG6468

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #40 on: December 11, 2012, 12:13:17 PM »
I love working on geneaology.  It's like finding treasure when you find a familly connection.   :-)

So far, all mine have come from Europe, although there is family legends that I have American Indian, on both sides ?????

My wife MAY have some Indian and French in her background, both from Canada. Ours are 1 part Swedish, 2 parts German and 1 part Irish.

7729 individuals, back to about 1560.
Illinois, south of the gun controllers in Chi town

Offline Dori

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #41 on: December 11, 2012, 12:25:17 PM »
My wife MAY have some Indian and French in her background, both from Canada. Ours are 1 part Swedish, 2 parts German and 1 part Irish.

7729 individuals, back to about 1560.

I have one from Amsterdam that died at sea in 1658.  His wife and sons lived in New Holland (now New York).   Part of the research is learning about the area they lived in and the customs/politics of the day.  As you go from generation to generation you learn a lot about just how this country was formed.

Oh and another one I have was the second wife of William Bradford from the Mayflower.  Bradford isn't my ancestor as his wife was a widow with two sons. She was British, but came from the Netherlands as one of the familys that had fled England because of religious persecution.

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Offline CactusCarlos

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #42 on: December 11, 2012, 01:07:08 PM »

Now that I've started it has become addictive and time consuming.  Luckily, on Ancestry I'm finding some interesting stories behind the names.


Just wait until you find yourself at graveyards taking pictures of the headstones and posting them online!  :-)

(My wife got into genealogy a few years ago - she does this.  :whatever:)
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Offline whiffleball

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #43 on: December 11, 2012, 01:12:43 PM »
I'm glad to see more stories here.  I love hearing the finds people make in their research.  It's all fascinating.

And, CC^, I'm already taking photos of headstones, just not posting yet.  :)

Offline CG6468

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #44 on: December 11, 2012, 05:44:44 PM »
One of my Swedish ancestors also died at sea.
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Offline Shooterman

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Re: Geneaology - Anybody into it?
« Reply #45 on: January 19, 2013, 04:34:21 PM »
Every family history is different. My fifth great grandfather  and his double brother in law, fought at King's Mountain under Col Sevier. who later became the first governor of Tennessee. They were all members of the Wautauga Association, which numbered somewhere probably between 1500 and 2000 families, all having followed the aforementioned brother in law of George to the settlements along the James River. William, the brother in law and his wife were the first settlers in Tennessee, Then part of the Indian Lands of North Carolina. Lydia, George's sister gave birth to the first white child born in Tennessee. George's wife, Elizabeth, my fifth great grandmother was the sister of William.

George's grandfather probably came here as an indentured servant. George and William ran with the Boone's, hunting, fishing, and fighting Indians.

When Cornwallis sent Patrick Ferguson south to secure the southern flank, Ferguson, being somewhat of an arrogant chap, issued a warning to the Southrons, lay down your arms and swear allegiance to the King or hang, The Wautauga men took umbrage, marched over the mountains, caught Ferguson at King's Mountain. whupped them badly and hung all the officers including Ferguson. They split the force, some going on to Cowpens and other fights, the rest marching back over the mountains to defend the settlements from marauding Cherokees, who, BTW, were allies of the Redcoats.

Jesse, George's grandson, my third great grandfather, fought at New Orleans with Andy Jackson. Later his son James was born in 1824, and the family moved to Arkansas in 1836. I believe they planned on coming to Texas, but  there was a small fracas in the doing, so they settled in Arkansas where Jesse died in 1843. James moved the family, including his concubine/s, mistress/s, or whatever his wife may have called her or them ( she/they were her sister/s ) to what is now Huntington, TX, about 100 miles north of where I live. He fought with Hood's Brigade in the War of Northern Aggression, which suffered many casualties in the war. He is buried in Huntington along with his wife, Susan Caroline.

In backtracking the family, I almost did not find Jesse, and his father before him and George before him. Genealogy can be fun, exasperating, wonderful, frustrating, even all in the same day.
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