Author Topic: grease job  (Read 1540 times)

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Offline franksolich

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grease job
« on: April 22, 2008, 10:01:43 AM »
I had to run to town to get some cigarettes this morning, and decided it would be a good opportunity to stop and speak with the automotive mechanic.

This is the Sandhills of Nebrasa; it can get dry and dusty here.

I asked when I could bring the motor vehicle in to get the joints greased, or oiled, or whatever's done to them, to keep them lubricated.

My jaw dropped when he told me one doesn't do that on newer vehicles.

Apparently the joints are greased or oiled or lubricated at the factory, and sealed.

I asked, well, then, what happens when a joint needs greased?

He said one runs the vehicle until the joint gives out, and then gets a new one.

What the fudge is this?

I always thought what made a good motor vehicle was that one could easily get into, and repair, things.

Why do they do that now, the manufacturers?

On the "average," considering an "average" vehicles, how many miles should a joint last?

Not that I'm having any joint problems; it's just I thought that such was part of "regular routine maintenance" on a motor vehicle.
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Offline Chris_

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Re: grease job
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2008, 11:47:10 AM »
I had to run to town to get some cigarettes this morning, and decided it would be a good opportunity to stop and speak with the automotive mechanic.

This is the Sandhills of Nebrasa; it can get dry and dusty here.

I asked when I could bring the motor vehicle in to get the joints greased, or oiled, or whatever's done to them, to keep them lubricated.

My jaw dropped when he told me one doesn't do that on newer vehicles.

Apparently the joints are greased or oiled or lubricated at the factory, and sealed.

I asked, well, then, what happens when a joint needs greased?

He said one runs the vehicle until the joint gives out, and then gets a new one.

What the fudge is this?

I always thought what made a good motor vehicle was that one could easily get into, and repair, things.

Why do they do that now, the manufacturers?

On the "average," considering an "average" vehicles, how many miles should a joint last?

Not that I'm having any joint problems; it's just I thought that such was part of "regular routine maintenance" on a motor vehicle.
Now when a part wears out, you "get" to pay for a replacement.  This makes more money for the manufacturer and for the mechanic.  They spin it as "less maintenance".   :whatever:
If you want to worship an orange pile of garbage with a reckless disregard for everything, get on down to Arbys & try our loaded curly fries.

Offline Chris_

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Re: grease job
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2008, 11:49:03 AM »
I had to run to town to get some cigarettes this morning, and decided it would be a good opportunity to stop and speak with the automotive mechanic.

This is the Sandhills of Nebrasa; it can get dry and dusty here.

I asked when I could bring the motor vehicle in to get the joints greased, or oiled, or whatever's done to them, to keep them lubricated.

My jaw dropped when he told me one doesn't do that on newer vehicles.

Apparently the joints are greased or oiled or lubricated at the factory, and sealed.

I asked, well, then, what happens when a joint needs greased?

He said one runs the vehicle until the joint gives out, and then gets a new one.

What the fudge is this?

I always thought what made a good motor vehicle was that one could easily get into, and repair, things.

Why do they do that now, the manufacturers?

On the "average," considering an "average" vehicles, how many miles should a joint last?

Not that I'm having any joint problems; it's just I thought that such was part of "regular routine maintenance" on a motor vehicle.
Now when a part wears out, you "get" to pay for a replacement.  This makes more money for the manufacturer and for the mechanic.  They spin it as "less maintenance".   :whatever:

It has been that way for years -- I think at least 20. I used to be a pretty good shade tree mechanic, but now you need too many specialty tools, like a C3PO to speak the binary language of water evaporators.

As far as how long until they wear out, it usually is no less than the extended warranty.  I suspect 100K, but they are sealed and thus don't leak lubricant.  I rarely hear about worn-out joints these days.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2008, 11:51:35 AM by freedumb2003 »
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Offline Chris_

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Re: grease job
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2008, 12:02:43 PM »
^You are correct....the new sealed lubrication points actually last longer than the old ones did that required routine lubrication, as the seals keep outside contaminants out.  In the old days, when you "greased" a ball joint, for example, it was impossible to eliminate the minute amount of grit/dust/particulate matter that was injected into the joint with the new grease.  These minute amounts of grit eventually caused the joint to fail.   Fact to remember....grease doesn't wear out.....if kept sealed, they can last a long time.

doc
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Offline Carl

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Re: grease job
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2008, 07:49:36 PM »
The CV joints on the half shafts are packed with a special grease and then the rubber boots are clamped in place.
They fail when the rubber deteriorates and the grease is lost.

Offline Lacarnut

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Re: grease job
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2008, 11:13:18 PM »
Quote from: lug-nut link=topic=6124.msg74394#msg74394 [/quote
Now when a part wears out, you "get" to pay for a replacement.  This makes more money for the manufacturer and for the mechanic.  They spin it as "less maintenance".   :whatever:

On BMW vehicles, your first brake job consists of NEW rotors/drums and brake pads. They do not machine them. Chunk the old ones away and put new ones on when you need a brake job.   

Offline Gwitness

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Re: grease job
« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2008, 12:26:42 AM »
Quote from: lug-nut link=topic=6124.msg74394#msg74394 [/quote
Now when a part wears out, you "get" to pay for a replacement.  This makes more money for the manufacturer and for the mechanic.  They spin it as "less maintenance".   :whatever:

On BMW vehicles, your first brake job consists of NEW rotors/drums and brake pads. They do not machine them. Chunk the old ones away and put new ones on when you need a brake job.   

h
High quality German engineering. ::)

Offline Randy

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Re: grease job
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2008, 03:42:00 AM »
Quote from: lug-nut link=topic=6124.msg74394#msg74394 [/quote
Now when a part wears out, you "get" to pay for a replacement.  This makes more money for the manufacturer and for the mechanic.  They spin it as "less maintenance".   :whatever:

On BMW vehicles, your first brake job consists of NEW rotors/drums and brake pads. They do not machine them. Chunk the old ones away and put new ones on when you need a brake job.   

On the early/mid 90's Plymouth Dusters it was cheaper to replace the drums and rotors than it was to turn one of them. Hell, using all aftermarket parts you could do a complete 4 wheel brake job with all new parts, calipers and cylinders included for under $100.

Offline Lacarnut

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Re: grease job
« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2008, 04:28:45 PM »
Quote from: lug-nut link=topic=6124.msg74394#msg74394 [/quote
Now when a part wears out, you "get" to pay for a replacement.  This makes more money for the manufacturer and for the mechanic.  They spin it as "less maintenance".   :whatever:

On BMW vehicles, your first brake job consists of NEW rotors/drums and brake pads. They do not machine them. Chunk the old ones away and put new ones on when you need a brake job.   

h
High quality German engineering. ::)

My insurance agent told me a brake job on his 911 Porsche was going to set him back $4k; that was many years ago so no telling what it cost today. 

Offline Chris_

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Re: grease job
« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2008, 04:34:21 PM »
My insurance agent told me a brake job on his 911 Porsche was going to set him back $4k; that was many years ago so no telling what it cost today. 

Oh mah goodness.  :o

Maybe I should re-think picking up that 944 Turbo. 

:(
If you want to worship an orange pile of garbage with a reckless disregard for everything, get on down to Arbys & try our loaded curly fries.