Author Topic: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?  (Read 984 times)

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Offline Mr Mannn

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What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« on: November 13, 2021, 12:13:21 AM »
I am a big fan of mixing up things.
I can take a can of chili, a single serving of rice and 4 ounces of shredded cheese...mix them up and you have a hearty meal.

same with Raman. I use two packages, both flavor pouches, a pound of hamburger, and more shredded cheese and again you have a great meal (some of the cheese melts and thickens the broth. GREAT!)

OK so now I am looking at vegetable soup. I have both cans of soup and dried veggie soup.
what would you mix that up with?
I have rice, lentils, beans and a lot of meats, chicken ham, beef.

add beef and potatoes for a stew...What would thicken the broth? Never made stew. could this be a base for a casserole?

Normally I am inventive, but I am at a loss here.

Offline thundley4

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2021, 07:38:37 AM »
There doesn't seem to be many recipe ideas for vegetable soup other than just adding beef or chicken to it.  There are tons of recipes for "cream of ?????" soups.

Offline Drafe Hoblin

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2021, 09:46:33 AM »
Add some toasted-oat cereal to it.  Immediately absorbs the broth.  Gives the illusion of being thick.
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Offline ExGeeEye

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2021, 10:04:53 AM »
My question is, how do you get shredded cheese from turning into a glob of mess that coats your utensils and mucks up your cookware and lends not a lot of flavor to the soup?
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Offline Mr Mannn

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2021, 07:10:14 PM »
My question is, how do you get shredded cheese from turning into a glob of mess that coats your utensils and mucks up your cookware and lends not a lot of flavor to the soup?

It works with Ramen. 4 OZ of cheese. Half melts and thickens the broth, the other half is scattered evenly throughout the ramen.

Offline Dblhaul

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2022, 11:30:00 PM »
Vegetable soup is easy, some ingredients depend upon what proteins you wish to use.
Choose your veggies. I use onion, carrots, celery, mushrooms and what else I have in the fridge.
Cook the veggies in a dutch oven with EVOO till the onion gets cooked then ad a broth based upon your protein. Chicken broth for chicken soup, beef broth for a veggie and beef soup. For chicken I use precooked yard bird, both the dark and white meats. for beef I use what ever left over roast/London broil/steak I have.
Season with S&P, if you like you can also add rice/barley/egg noodles.   

Offline ABC-2

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2022, 09:25:02 AM »
ABC to the rescue    :-)  with a little help from my Southern Living magazines  ...

On how to thicken soup.

Quote
Add flour or corn starch.

You can thicken soup by adding flour or corn starch. For the best results, never add the flour or corn starch directly to your soup. If you do, it will clump up on top. Instead, ladle a small amount of broth into a separate bowl and let it cool. Add a few tablespoons of flour or cornstarch to the bowl and whisk until it's blended smooth. Next, bring the soup to a simmer and add the mixture back to the pot.

Pro tip: Don't dump in the entire mixture at once. You may thicken your soup too much. Instead, add a small amount at a time until it reaches the desired consistency

Try it, you'll like it, it works for me! 

See more here:  https://www.southernliving.com/food/dish/soup/how-to-thicken-soup
« Last Edit: May 01, 2022, 09:35:39 AM by ABC-2 »
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Offline RuralNc

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2022, 08:26:29 AM »
Another great thickner for soups, Instant Mashed Potatoes. Or, Potato Flour.

Offline Mr Mannn

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #8 on: June 26, 2022, 11:57:33 PM »
Another great thickner for soups, Instant Mashed Potatoes. Or, Potato Flour.
I had not considered instant mashed potatoes as a kind of flour, but now a whole set of possibilities are open. 
Now I wonder if you could mix with real flour and make a kind of potato bread like that.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2022, 11:59:58 PM by Mr Mannn »

Offline RuralNc

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #9 on: June 29, 2022, 08:35:51 PM »
I had not considered instant mashed potatoes as a kind of flour, but now a whole set of possibilities are open. 
Now I wonder if you could mix with real flour and make a kind of potato bread like that.

Just saw your response.

I can answer that question. Im a professional Baker, by trade.

You can absolutely use Instant taters in bread dough. I occasionally offer it for sell, in my business. Sometimes I offer it in "Sammich Bread", sometimes in Buns, or Rolls. Sometimes whole unsliced loaves.

Instant Potatoes help bread to hold onto moisture, offering a longer shelf life. Also, brings a sort of earthiness to the flavor profile. I prefer the Walmart Great Value brand. They have no off taste, and are dirt cheap. They come in a brown box. At my local Walmart, they are in the Ethnic Section. Beats me as to why.. Bobs Red Meal offers actual Potato Flour. Its nearly the exact same thing for 3 times the money. God Bless Capitalism.  :)

I work in metric, so you would have to experiment. But, I usually use about 20% potatoes, by weight. So that translates to approx. 1/3 cup instant potatoes substituted for about 3 tbsp. flour. So, measure out your flour by scooping it into the measuring cup, then take out about 3 tbsp. Then put in, 1/3 cup potatoes. Thats for every cup of flour in your recipe.

Or, just by a cheap set of kitchen scales that measure in metric, from Wally World.  :-)

Moisture. The potatoes suck up the water in your dough. You will most definitely have to add more water. I usually make 8 loaves at once in the mixer, (20 quart) so I add the potatoes in little by little so the dough doesnt seize up. But I assume you would be making 1 loaf at a time, in something like a KitchenAid. You should have no problems. Just keep some extra water to drizzle in if needed.

If I can be of further assistance, dont hesitate. I can share a couple recipe's if you like as well.

Offline Eupher

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #10 on: June 30, 2022, 05:59:23 AM »
Just saw your response.

I can answer that question. Im a professional Baker, by trade.

You can absolutely use Instant taters in bread dough. I occasionally offer it for sell, in my business. Sometimes I offer it in "Sammich Bread", sometimes in Buns, or Rolls. Sometimes whole unsliced loaves.

Instant Potatoes help bread to hold onto moisture, offering a longer shelf life. Also, brings a sort of earthiness to the flavor profile. I prefer the Walmart Great Value brand. They have no off taste, and are dirt cheap. They come in a brown box. At my local Walmart, they are in the Ethnic Section. Beats me as to why.. Bobs Red Meal offers actual Potato Flour. Its nearly the exact same thing for 3 times the money. God Bless Capitalism.  :)

I work in metric, so you would have to experiment. But, I usually use about 20% potatoes, by weight. So that translates to approx. 1/3 cup instant potatoes substituted for about 3 tbsp. flour. So, measure out your flour by scooping it into the measuring cup, then take out about 3 tbsp. Then put in, 1/3 cup potatoes. Thats for every cup of flour in your recipe.

Or, just by a cheap set of kitchen scales that measure in metric, from Wally World.  :-)

Moisture. The potatoes suck up the water in your dough. You will most definitely have to add more water. I usually make 8 loaves at once in the mixer, (20 quart) so I add the potatoes in little by little so the dough doesnt seize up. But I assume you would be making 1 loaf at a time, in something like a KitchenAid. You should have no problems. Just keep some extra water to drizzle in if needed.

If I can be of further assistance, dont hesitate. I can share a couple recipe's if you like as well.

Thread jack, as I'm chiming in on the bread thing.

45 years ago I was an Army cook and during my 1st enlistment for a few months, I and one other guy were the mess hall's night bakers. Learned a lot, but we didn't bake bread. Kept it simple with desserts and homemade doughnuts. But Mrs. E and I have been experimenting with sourdough bread (that starter's a PITA to maintain) and we've been using various recipes. One recipe that seems to be a winner is from the America's Test Kitchen - it's easy, though the first proof is a minimum of 8 hours and up to 18 hours.

Even they continue to use AP flour. I'd always used bread flour for the higher gluten content, but ATK's recipes are generally bulletproof.

What's your take on bread flour versus AP flour, specific to baking bread?
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Offline RuralNc

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #11 on: June 30, 2022, 02:08:08 PM »
Thread jack, as I'm chiming in on the bread thing.

45 years ago I was an Army cook and during my 1st enlistment for a few months, I and one other guy were the mess hall's night bakers. Learned a lot, but we didn't bake bread. Kept it simple with desserts and homemade doughnuts. But Mrs. E and I have been experimenting with sourdough bread (that starter's a PITA to maintain) and we've been using various recipes. One recipe that seems to be a winner is from the America's Test Kitchen - it's easy, though the first proof is a minimum of 8 hours and up to 18 hours.

Even they continue to use AP flour. I'd always used bread flour for the higher gluten content, but ATK's recipes are generally bulletproof.

What's your take on bread flour versus AP flour, specific to baking bread?

Thread Jack? Nonsense. Mr Mannn asked about bread, so here we are!  :-)

Doughnuts? Heck yeah!

You didnt ask, but Ill chime in on the Sourdough. I have a love hate relationship with it. I keep a starter for personal use. Just in case we go back down the road we were traversing several months ago. My Wholesale suppliers were running out of commerical yeast (pound size bricks). Under the current potato in office, an apocalypse wouldnt surprise me. I figure I can still make some bread for me and the Mrs. at the least.  Thats mainly why I keep one.

In case you havent tried it, you might try doing your bulk rise overnight. I have done that with good results. My schedule would be something like:

2 PM feed starter.
6-8 PM mix bread dough with starter.
8-10 AM knock down and shape.
Bake when ready.

Americas Test Kitchen is a good source. I have a couple of their books. Always looking for new ideas, thats for sure. Just a couple weeks ago I got ATK "The Perfect Cookie". So, so, many tasty recipes in there.

Now to your question about Bread Flour. If you have it, use it! I use very little AP flour. I use it for Cookies, and Challah Bread. Thats it. Bread Flour will always offer a stronger rise, and more robust gluten structure. Dont hesitate to try it, even with the ATK recipes. The only appreciable difference you should notice, is that you might need a tad more water/moisture.

I might be biased, but 100 percent prefer King Arthur. That flour is held to very strict standards.


Offline Eupher

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #12 on: June 30, 2022, 08:42:04 PM »
Thread Jack? Nonsense. Mr Mannn asked about bread, so here we are!  :-)

Doughnuts? Heck yeah!

You didnt ask, but Ill chime in on the Sourdough. I have a love hate relationship with it. I keep a starter for personal use. Just in case we go back down the road we were traversing several months ago. My Wholesale suppliers were running out of commerical yeast (pound size bricks). Under the current potato in office, an apocalypse wouldnt surprise me. I figure I can still make some bread for me and the Mrs. at the least.  Thats mainly why I keep one.

In case you havent tried it, you might try doing your bulk rise overnight. I have done that with good results. My schedule would be something like:

2 PM feed starter.
6-8 PM mix bread dough with starter.
8-10 AM knock down and shape.
Bake when ready.

Americas Test Kitchen is a good source. I have a couple of their books. Always looking for new ideas, thats for sure. Just a couple weeks ago I got ATK "The Perfect Cookie". So, so, many tasty recipes in there.

Now to your question about Bread Flour. If you have it, use it! I use very little AP flour. I use it for Cookies, and Challah Bread. Thats it. Bread Flour will always offer a stronger rise, and more robust gluten structure. Dont hesitate to try it, even with the ATK recipes. The only appreciable difference you should notice, is that you might need a tad more water/moisture.

I might be biased, but 100 percent prefer King Arthur. That flour is held to very strict standards.

I doubled ATK's recipe for their "Almost No Knead" bread. Calls for 3 cups of AP flour for a single recipe, so I used 3 cups of AP and 3 cups of bread flour. I was shocked at how little yeast the recipe called for - one-half teaspoon for all that flour. It calls for a couple tablespoons of white vinegar and 12 tablespoons of a mild lager and a little table salt. The last time we used Sam Adams Boston Lager, which turned out OK. They warn you not to use a stronger lager as it makes the bread bitter. Seemed OK to me, but I definitely messed up the last time I made this recipe by using waaaaaay too much yeast. LOL. Got it right this time. The bread's in the first proofing stage right now. Will form it up tomorrow morning, put it in the dutch oven, and let it proof again then bake it off. It's supposed to give kind of an artisan, French bread-like texture, which we like.

Agreed about King Arthur flour. That's what we use.

I think Mrs. E gave up on the sourdough. We love it, but the starter thing is just too much of a PITA. All that "feeding." What's next? Burping your starter?  :lmao:
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Offline RuralNc

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #13 on: July 02, 2022, 10:12:13 PM »
I doubled ATK's recipe for their "Almost No Knead" bread. Calls for 3 cups of AP flour for a single recipe, so I used 3 cups of AP and 3 cups of bread flour. I was shocked at how little yeast the recipe called for - one-half teaspoon for all that flour. It calls for a couple tablespoons of white vinegar and 12 tablespoons of a mild lager and a little table salt. The last time we used Sam Adams Boston Lager, which turned out OK. They warn you not to use a stronger lager as it makes the bread bitter. Seemed OK to me, but I definitely messed up the last time I made this recipe by using waaaaaay too much yeast. LOL. Got it right this time. The bread's in the first proofing stage right now. Will form it up tomorrow morning, put it in the dutch oven, and let it proof again then bake it off. It's supposed to give kind of an artisan, French bread-like texture, which we like.

Agreed about King Arthur flour. That's what we use.

I think Mrs. E gave up on the sourdough. We love it, but the starter thing is just too much of a PITA. All that "feeding." What's next? Burping your starter?  :lmao:

Yeast is a funny thing. Its the only ingredient I know of that doesnt scale up in a linear fashion. Other ingredients are predictable. Yeast it not. SO many variables affect it.

The amount of yeast quoted actually sounds reasonable to me. As a baker, patience is the name of the game. The less yeast you use, the more flavor your bread should have. Fermentation slows down, allowing the yeast to create more complex flavors. Also, by slowing down fermentation, the less chance of over proofing you have.

My Sandwich Bread recipe which makes 8 loaves, uses 3.12 Kilos of flour, which is about 26 cups of flour. I use 4 tsp. of yeast. Takes about 5ish hours on the bulk rise, and about 1 to 1.5 hours on the proof.

Offline Eupher

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #14 on: July 03, 2022, 08:41:47 AM »
Yeast is a funny thing. Its the only ingredient I know of that doesnt scale up in a linear fashion. Other ingredients are predictable. Yeast it not. SO many variables affect it.

The amount of yeast quoted actually sounds reasonable to me. As a baker, patience is the name of the game. The less yeast you use, the more flavor your bread should have. Fermentation slows down, allowing the yeast to create more complex flavors. Also, by slowing down fermentation, the less chance of over proofing you have.

My Sandwich Bread recipe which makes 8 loaves, uses 3.12 Kilos of flour, which is about 26 cups of flour. I use 4 tsp. of yeast. Takes about 5ish hours on the bulk rise, and about 1 to 1.5 hours on the proof.

Interesting about the yeast scale-up. I simply wasn't paying close enough attention to the quantity for the yeast the first time I baked this bread, which is why I was positive I read 2 packages rather than 1/2 tsp.  :thatsright:

But this time, the bread turned out beautifully. Nice, crispy crust and aromatic innards. We used Yuengling lager (12 tbsp) and the prescribed 2 tbsp white vinegar along with the flour (50% AP, 50% hard), 1/2 tsp yeast, and salt. ATK puts in an explanation as to why the recipe works and I wish I understood the chemistry more than I do. But it works.

One other aspect about ATK's recipe is that they call on the use of a dutch oven to bake the bread. I bought a 5 qt cast iron dutch oven (7 inches tall, split up in a 2 inch base pan and a 5 inch top pan) as we prefer a taller loaf, seasoned it 3 times with avocado oil, and the browning worked well. (Sorry, no photo.)
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Offline Crazy Horse

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #15 on: July 27, 2022, 03:06:11 AM »
I had not considered instant mashed potatoes as a kind of flour, but now a whole set of possibilities are open. 
Now I wonder if you could mix with real flour and make a kind of potato bread like that.

Back to this for the time. Another good thickening agen for soups and chili is masa as it thickens and adds flavor
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Offline RuralNc

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #16 on: August 03, 2022, 08:30:52 PM »
Back to this for the time. Another good thickening agen for soups and chili is masa as it thickens and adds flavor

Forgot all about Masa. Growing up, Mom would buy... "Carrol Shelbys Chili Mix"? Something like that. I dont remember the name for sure now. It came in a brown paper bag, and had individual spice bags, salt, etc. It included Masa as a thickener. Mom never used it, but preferred tomato paste.

Offline Dblhaul

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #17 on: October 31, 2022, 11:53:47 PM »
LOL, I remember using Carrol Shelbys Chili Mix a long time ago. He made great cars but so so chili.

Offline RuralNc

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Re: What can you do with vegitable soup? How to mix it up?
« Reply #18 on: November 16, 2022, 05:37:08 AM »
LOL, I remember using Carrol Shelbys Chili Mix a long time ago. He made great cars but so so chili.

Hey now. We ate gallons of the stuff growing up. Momma wouldnt do it any other way.  :-)